Research

The Margaret Hackett Family Program (MHFP) supports and engages in research dedicated to improving treatments and bettering surgical outcomes for patients with CNS congenital anomalies. Learn more about the MHFP’s research below.

The MHFP Database

The primary goal of the Margaret Hackett Family Program (MHFP) Database is to gather comprehensive patient medical histories into a database to monitor and store information that may be helpful in bettering patient care. The MHFP Database uses REDCap to collect extensive information about patient symptoms, treatments, and surgical history. By collecting this information, the MHFP and its collaborating institutions will have access to data that may help better understand and improve patient treatments and surgical outcomes. Current collaborating sites are located in Los Angeles, CA, Boston, MA, and Charlotte, NC.

Chiari I Malformation: Are Surgical Outcomes linked to Morphological Changes?

The MHFP has partnered up with Dr. Francis Loth of the University of Akron Conquer Chiari Research Center on a study to determine if individual patient skull morphology (or the structure of the skull), and/or the morphological changes that result from surgery, can predict a patient’s surgical outcome. This study has the potential to link a patient’s morphology to their surgical outcome, which will provide surgeons with valuable data to help determine patient selection for surgery, and whether or not good outcomes can be expected. The impact of this work can extend to the advancement of techniques for quantifying brain morphometrics and its relationship to diagnosis, prognosis, and/or treatment development of a broad spectrum of diseases.

Learn More about Dr. Francis Loth

Learn More about the Conquer Chiari Research Center

Learn More about Dr. Francis Loth

Learn More about the Conquer Chiari Research Center

Chiari I Malformation: Are Surgical Outcomes linked to Morphological Changes?

The MHFP has partnered up with Dr. Francis Loth of the University of Akron Conquer Chiari Research Center on a study to determine if individual patient skull morphology (or the structure of the skull), and/or the morphological changes that result from surgery, can predict a patient’s surgical outcome. This study has the potential to link a patient’s morphology to their surgical outcome, which will provide surgeons with valuable data to help determine patient selection for surgery, and whether or not good outcomes can be expected. The impact of this work can extend to the advancement of techniques for quantifying brain morphometrics and its relationship to diagnosis, prognosis, and/or treatment development of a broad spectrum of diseases.

Lab Research

The Margaret Hackett Family Program (MHFP) Basic Research Group, lead by David Frim, M.D, Ph.D., focuses on the understanding of brain injury pathways and potential treatment paradigms. Traumatic closed head injuries are common problems that are caused by car accidents and sports injuries. In addition, unusual impacts such as those caused during traumatic births can also cause injuries to the brain. Currently, there are very few treatments that can help reduce the severity of an injury to the brain, and severely injured adults and children can become significantly and permanently disabled. The MHFP laboratory focuses on rodent models that mimic closed brain injuries and brain hemorrhage (or bleeding in the brain). These paradigms allow us to study the mechanisms and pathways of brain injury that will allow testing of various treatments that may reduce or even fully protect the brain from injury.

Learn More about David Frim, M.D., Ph.D.